Trading in blood diamonds

The international trade in diamonds and other precious stones is still plagued by potential fraud, criminal gangs and child labor. In this amazing case study we look at how companies like De Beers The illicit trade in blood diamonds has funded brutal wars and human rights abuse for decades. Despite progress, the problem still exists. Read about our work. Abuse of the legitimate diamond trade in Zimbabwe prompted calls to redefine blood diamonds as gems whose trade is based on aggression or violence of any kind. Such a redefinition would expand the campaign against blood diamonds to some diamond-rich countries where the denial of human rights is common.

"Conflict-Free Diamonds". Nations who agree to participate in the Kimberly process are not permitted to trade with nonmember Nations. The Kimberly Process is  21 May 2010 A diamond necklace by Cartier, one of the most recent major jewelers to publicly boycott blood diamonds from Zimbabwe. © 2007 Reuters. However all countries that trade and sell diamonds are complicit in the misery and terror associated with conflict diamonds, including Canada. Frequently asked  30 Sep 2015 A man displays a rough diamond, from the Boda region, for sale in Bangui, CAR, May 1, 2014. MOLESKINE. The blood diamond trade is tearing  9 Jun 2014 Trade in so-called blood diamonds is the subject of this week's meeting in Shanghai of the Kimberley Process, an international body set up to 

exclude conflict diamonds from international trade.' Conflict diamonds both financed and motivated vicious terrorist organizations in Sierra Leone, Angola, and 

30 Sep 2015 Diamond trading firms could soon start exporting stones stockpiled during the conflict, if CAR is seen to have met conditions set by the  1 Oct 2015 Diamonds have continued to be traded within CAR despite the ban, with thousands of small artisanal miners selling to traders who then sell on to  28 Jun 2015 Liberia: A 14-year civil war created ample opportunity for the illicit diamond trade to flourish. Not only did Liberia allegedly sell diamonds to Al  exclude conflict diamonds from international trade.' Conflict diamonds both financed and motivated vicious terrorist organizations in Sierra Leone, Angola, and  In 2001, the trading of all rough stones originating from Sierra Leone or Liberia was declared illegal Are Conflict Diamonds Being Traded in the Market Now?

7 Oct 2015 No one wants to declare love with a blood diamond. when diamond merchants met to brainstorm ways to stop trade in conflict diamonds.

Abuse of the legitimate diamond trade in Zimbabwe prompted calls to redefine blood diamonds as gems whose trade is based on aggression or violence of any kind. Such a redefinition would expand the campaign against blood diamonds to some diamond-rich countries where the denial of human rights is common. Diamonds that fuel civil wars are often called "blood" or "conflict" diamonds. Although many diamond-fueled wars have now ended, conflict diamonds remain a serious problem. In 2013, a civil war erupted in the Central African Republic, with both sides fighting over the country’s diamond resources. The only way that the blood will finally be washed away from conflict diamonds is if there is a true fair-trade-certification process that allows conscientious consumers to buy Congo’s artisanal Many of the blood diamonds from Sierra Leone were traded to the Liberian president, Charles G. Taylor, in exchange for weapons and military training from the AFRC. It has been argued that controlling the diamond mines, rather than overthrowing the corrupt government, was the real reason behind the decade-long war.

The diamond industry estimates that conflict diamonds represent 4 percent of the total trade in rough diamonds. Others have estimated that conflict diamonds could amount to as high as 15 percent of the total trade. In 2001, the diamond industry produced rough diamonds with a market value of $7.9 billion.

The illicit trade in blood diamonds has funded brutal wars and human rights abuse for decades. Despite progress, the problem still exists. Read about our work. Abuse of the legitimate diamond trade in Zimbabwe prompted calls to redefine blood diamonds as gems whose trade is based on aggression or violence of any kind. Such a redefinition would expand the campaign against blood diamonds to some diamond-rich countries where the denial of human rights is common. Diamonds that fuel civil wars are often called "blood" or "conflict" diamonds. Although many diamond-fueled wars have now ended, conflict diamonds remain a serious problem. In 2013, a civil war erupted in the Central African Republic, with both sides fighting over the country’s diamond resources. The only way that the blood will finally be washed away from conflict diamonds is if there is a true fair-trade-certification process that allows conscientious consumers to buy Congo’s artisanal Many of the blood diamonds from Sierra Leone were traded to the Liberian president, Charles G. Taylor, in exchange for weapons and military training from the AFRC. It has been argued that controlling the diamond mines, rather than overthrowing the corrupt government, was the real reason behind the decade-long war.

"Conflict-Free Diamonds". Nations who agree to participate in the Kimberly process are not permitted to trade with nonmember Nations. The Kimberly Process is 

2 Dec 2016 Cameroon is allowing conflict diamonds from the Central African Republic to cross over its borders and into the legal supply chain due to poor  The international trade in diamonds and other precious stones is still plagued by potential fraud, criminal gangs and child labor. In this amazing case study we look at how companies like De Beers The illicit trade in blood diamonds has funded brutal wars and human rights abuse for decades. Despite progress, the problem still exists. Read about our work. Abuse of the legitimate diamond trade in Zimbabwe prompted calls to redefine blood diamonds as gems whose trade is based on aggression or violence of any kind. Such a redefinition would expand the campaign against blood diamonds to some diamond-rich countries where the denial of human rights is common. Diamonds that fuel civil wars are often called "blood" or "conflict" diamonds. Although many diamond-fueled wars have now ended, conflict diamonds remain a serious problem. In 2013, a civil war erupted in the Central African Republic, with both sides fighting over the country’s diamond resources.

9 Jun 2014 Trade in so-called blood diamonds is the subject of this week's meeting in Shanghai of the Kimberley Process, an international body set up to  20 Dec 2019 The blood diamond trade has funded the overthrow of legitimate governments and impeded international efforts to promote peace and stability  Jonas Savimbi, and the Liberian government still violate the trade and weapons bans with the help of a global network of arms dealers, diamond merchants and  The diamonds trade not only fuels conflicts in countries such as the Democratic Republic of Congo, but leads to poverty, social inequalities, human exploitation  10 Sep 2018 Stones being mined illegally, often by slaves, and sold by countries to fund civil wars. These diamonds known as 'Blood Diamonds' or 'Conflict